Wednesday, March 10, 2010

HOW TO REMOVE OIL PAINT FROM ANYTHING


AN ARTIST PSA


Oil paint gets everywhere. It's just something you have to make peace with as an artist. No one ever tells you that once you incorporate painting into your life that you should expect and anticipate dried paint to turn up everywhere, especially in the most unexpected places.

I've walked around for days with a smudge of cadmium orange accenting the highlights in my braids, at the back of my head where I couldn't see. Just the other day someone pointed out that I had a touch of Rembrant noire d'ivoire on the tip of my nose. I imagine it's how new mothers must feel after dealing with poopy diapers, after a while they may just give in to the notion that their definition of cleanliness and perfection has changed -no, expanded to include a genre unimagined in their former life. At least that's how most professional artists feel. In the numerous years that I have been painting I have tried just about every product known to man to remove dried oil paint from clothing, and the like (carpets, upholstered furniture, you get my drift!). And the best product, the only product, in fact, which left no trace or stain from paint, or residue is Kiss Off.

The key to all stain removal is to never (and I mean never) put the article of clothing in the dryer. That is universal. If you find the stain while folding clothes after doing laundry the stain can't be undone because it's been "cooked" into the fibers. The new alternative is to make that shirt/skirt/pants your new painting wardrobe or my personal favorite, cut it up and use it for rags versus some random rag one purchased. Some of my rag mementos include tees from past vacations, boxer shorts that my older sister wore to cheerleading practice back in the 90s, and favorite shirts that have been ruined by oil paint in their previous lives. Get creative. And use every step in life, even a mishap, and make it a part of your process.

SECRET TO CLEAN BRUSHES: The best tool to remove paint from brushes is Lefranc Bourgeois' Brush Cleaning Fluid / Luquide a Nettoyer Les Brosses. Unfortunately, I do not believe this product is sold in the United States but it surpasses every product ever created, in my opinion. This product would totally be worth the day of detention in customs if one were to opt to smuggle it into the states -but you didn't hear that from me.

1 comment:

  1. The reason for beginning the project has been taken up in many ways by many different people but to me, it was by necessity. I had been going bigger and bigger with my own canvas paintings up to 2m x 1.2m and still feeling constricted in what I could do. As well as the financial side of producing paintings that size! automotive paint

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